Totley History Group
Totley History Group

A Little Scouting History

21st Sheffield (Cherrytree) Scouts, 1st August 1915. 21st Sheffield (Cherrytree) Scouts, 1st August 1915. Back Row: Ford, Foster, Mr Wingfield, Shearer, E. Belbin. Middle row: C. Belbin, Bird, Webb, Pearson, ?. Front Row: Stubbs, Smith, Johnson, Reeves, Foster

For two weeks during 1939 the Scouts from 85th Sheffield, St. John's, Abbeydale were enjoying their annual camp at Barmston, Nr. Bridlington. The boys enjoyed the usual camp activities of games, practical instruction, messing about, getting wet when it rained and sunburnt when the sun shone. They were only vaguely aware of the airplane target practice out over Bridlington Bay and the artillery exercises in the next field, and even when one of the younger assistant leaders received a letter to cut short his camp and report to the R.A.F. they were merely only sorry to see him go. It was not until their return back to Sheffield that they became aware of .the worsening international situation and the threat of impending war.

 

The Scout Troop had been formed in 1915 during the First World War meeting in various places until settling in Totley Orphanage until 1922, then the Old Laundry on Totley Rise until 1924, and eventually the old V.A.D. hospital, (now the post sorting office) next to St. John's Church.

 

Some of the first activities in which the Scouts were involved on formation were as orderlies at the St. John's War Hospital, collecting waste paper and. bottles, working on local farms and. participating in the War Savings Scheme.

 

Until 1944, when 1st Totley Scouts were formed, the 85th were the only Scout Troop in the area, 267th Dore being formed in 1949, and the 115th U.R.C. and 297th* Bradway  much later during the 1960s.

 

On the outbreak of the Second World War the Scouts were again helping in many ways. In 1940 they collected 10 tons of scrap metal - with a value of £2, in addition to waste paper although this was difficult to dispose of. The collections were possible due to the loan of carts from a local firm of builders, Messrs Allen.

 

The Scouts were also involved in A.R.P. work acting as messengers and helping at their various displays and demonstrate.ions . This included instructing local people in the use of a stirrup pump in the case of incendiary bombs, and the best way to treat windows against blast damage.

 

Weekly Ambulance practice at Abbeydale Hall was helped along by Scouts volunteering as mock casualties and again in mock gas incidents on Mickley Lane.

 

In May 1940 the Scout Leader Dr. Mary Andrews was forced to resign due to her increasing involvement in Red Cross lectures and A.R.P. work in the Hope Valley where she lived. Dr. Andrews had been Scout Leader since 1919 and was succeeded by Les Broadbent briefly until his call up to the Army, and then by G.B. Smith.

 

At the same time the Scouts lost the use of the meeting place as the old hospital had once again been requisitioned for war use. Following hard work by the Scouts and Cubs, and donations from supporters, a wooden hut was found and purchased for £50.

 

This was a responsible feat at the time due to the shortage of wood and subsequently usually prohibitive price. In any event it was obtained only just before Government Timber Controls came into force.

 

In between their usual work the Scouts dug the foundations for the brickwork to support the hut which was to be sited behind St. John's Church. The project was eventually completed and officially opened on 12th October 1940 by the Lord Mayor, Councillor Luther Milner, who lived locally, and Rev. T.M. Archer the Vicar at St. John's. Sufficient ways around the food controls were found to provide tea and cakes inside the hut to those gathered.

 

At the time of the Sheffield Blitz in December 1940 the Scouts were out collecting blankets to deliver to the school rooms on Grove Road which was being used. as a rest centre for refugees. 'They were also out in the City Centre distributing food from the back of vans and lorries.

 

The Troop was to celebrate their Silver Jubilee on 15th December 1940 with a grand party and camp fire, but obviously this had to be postponed due to the blitz until the following February.

 

On 12th July 1941 Sheffield was visited by the Chief Scout, Lord Somers who had just been appointed on the death of the original Chief Scout and Founder Baden-Powell. To celebrate a display was put on by Scouts from all around the city in the Farm Grounds, Granville Road. The 85th Scouts were there demonstrating incendiary bomb fighting and first aid.

 

Throughout the war the Scouts undertook National Service by working on Longshaw Estate. Many weekends were spent trimming and felling trees, digging ditches and any other work as directed by the National Trust.

 

Some of the Scouts worked. with the Scout Service Bureau in local hospitals, and others as part of an Emergency Patrol.

 

On a lighter note towards the end of the war in 1945 the Scouts helped in Abbeydale Park serving teas ,selling programmes etc., on the occasion of a cricket match between an R.A.F. XI and Wally Hammond's XI.

 

Inevitably the war forced many changes in the Troop, with most at the senior Scouts and Leaders being called up to serve in many parts of the world. Very little traditional Scout work was possible due to the many other duties required, but throughout the period regular meetings were possible and at one time membership of the Troop had to be closed as there were too many boys.

 

Eventually on 1st September 1945 the Troop assembled at Dore and Totley station to board a train to their annual camp at Abney, Nr. Hathersage carrying their kit in the trek cart to enjoy seven days in a peaceful countryside doing what Scouts had done before the war, cooking their meals on fires, and generally having a good time.

 

July 1993

 

 

* Our thanks go to Andrew Jones, of the Sheffield Scout Archives for correcting an error in this unattributed article reproduced from Totley Independent Issue 165.

 

 

Dear Editor,

 

My main  purpose in writing is to correct a mis-statement of history in the article 'A Little Scouting Hist,ory' in the July/August issue (of Totley Independent). There was a Scout Troop in Totley before the 1st Totley was formed at the end of the War - it was the All Saints Totley Scout Group attached to the Church and it's members formed the 1st Totley when the then Scout Master, Leslie Aubrey fell out with the Vicar, The Rev. J. Hutton. I'm not sure when the All Saints Totley Group was formed but it was going strong at the beginning of the war when I joined and kept going all through the War.

 

A number of camps were held in the second half of the War complete with camouflage nets and I well remember a very wet Patrol Leaders Easter Camp held at Millers Dale when, in utter frustration we took the train to Buxton and saw the film Haltes Castle with terrible thunderstorms on the screen and outside!

 

I'm sure other members of the All Saints Group will be writing to you to put the record straight.
 
Yours sincerely,
Edmund Short
P.S. Known as Shorty in my Scout days!

 

September 1993

 

 

I would like to correct a statement in the article 'A Little Bit of Scouting History' Jul/Aug issue, that the 85th. troop based at St. John's was the only troop in the area before 1944. I came to live in Totley in 1932 and joined (I think) the First Totley Scout Troup which had its headquarters at Totley Rise Methodist Church at the end of Grove Road. The scout master of the day was Ernest Jacques, one of the first war (1939-45) casualties from Totley.

 

One supposes this group lapsed during the war years and was reborn in 1944.

 

Just how long the troop was in existence before I joined I don't know, sixty years is a long time.

 

Mr. R. Peace

Bradway

 

 

More About The Scouts

As usual it was good to see the Independent this last week. Last Month's issue certainly aroused some comment over "All Saints" Scout Group and now as a founder member of it I would like to set the record straight. 

 

It sprang from a Bible class held in the church room in 1931/2, run by Leslie Aubrey, developed into a boys club held in the old Mission room of All Saints Church. This created a lot of problems for the school and headmaster, Johnny Wood, became a little exasperated with us from time to time - particularly the disappearance of disciplinary equipment. Some of the parents felt they ought to help and suggested forming a Scout Group. Leslie Aubrey again obliged, went on instruction courses, and formed the 1st. All Saints Totley Scout Group in 1932. Eight lads were asked to form the nucleus of the troop, Jeff Salt, Ken Seals, Harry Bull, Alan Haywood, Frank Johnson and myself plus two names I cannot recall. 

 

In retrospect, I think this caused a lot of ill feeling amongst those who were not chosen, but it soon disappeared when we had all passed our 2nd. class tests and opened membership to any lad over 11. We could not however continue meeting at the school, but after looking around for accommodation we found generous help from the Landlord of the Crown Inn. They had a wooden tea room, on what is now a car park, which they rented to us for half a crown (12.5 pence) a week. We were then able to leave all our equipment there in security. Cubs were later introduced, about 1935, led by Miss Kitty Rayton, assisted by my late brother Baron. A lot of hard work was put in by the scouts and their parents. 

 

We came under the Chesterfield area until 1934/5 and in fact we won a competition in Chesterfield for Lady Baden Powell's Lion, of which we were justly proud. I vaguely remember 'Shorty," but I can never remember the troop at Totley Rise, hardly surprising after some sixty odd years. I believe the group carried on during the war years, but unfortunately when war was declared, the army commandeered our H.Q. and all its contents. I suppose if we had kept a Roll of Honour a few of the original troop would head it, Ken Seals, George Pulford, Ken and Vincent Webster plus more I cannot recall. 

 

Yours sincerely 
Bill Turner

October 1993

 

Totley All Saints Scouts Group

by Jo Rundle

The Scout Hut, Totley Hall Lane The Scout Hut, Totley Hall Lane

Until 1933 there were no Scouts in Totley, the nearest group being 2 miles away at St. John's Church Abbeydale Road where Dr. Mary Andrews was the Scout Master. There was never any obvious interest from my two elder brothers, possibly because Totley village was very remote from the activities so far away or, because they knew that my Father was of the opinion that Scouts were the beginning of militarism, and would not allow them to join. Nor did I hear of any village boys who had the urge to join. 

 

Then, in 1933, during a discussion with six 13 year-old boys at the end of a Sunday-school class in the 'Tin-tabernacle' room of All Saint's School, Lesley Aubrey, (Aubrey to those close to him), an enthusiastic and enterprising teacher, suggested that they should form a troupe of Totley Scouts. The first problem was a place to meet, and here, after a little negotiating with Mrs Milner of Totley Hall, they were offered the white-tiled old round kitchen at the base of the turret, which still contained the circular wrought-iron staircase that led to the large dining room above. Sadly three of the boys; Ken Seals, Vin and Ken Webster, lost their lives very early in the second world war, and the names of the other three elude me. However, the following extract from the All Saints Church magazine of January 1937 may threw some light on one of them, for the name of Johnson is mentioned, possibly indicating that this was John Johnson of Lanehead who was the same age and a friend of Jeff’s, perhaps someone will remember a friend or relative who was one of the other two originals. 

 

With Aubrey as their Scoutmaster the troupe flourished, and in 1935 Jeff, now a King's Scout, had the great honour of representing Derbyshire at the St. George's Day Parade of Boy Scouts in the great Hall and Chapel at Windsor Castle. One of his proudest memories was his meeting with King George 5th an experience to be repeated in 1937 when he represented Derbyshire again at Windsor Castle, this time to meet the new King George 6th. Jeff was a dedicated King's Scout, and the family were very proud when he represented Derbyshire at the World Scout Jamboree in Scotland a year later; a week he said he would never forget with memories of the King moving freely amongst them and heartily joining in with their songs, as well as the many friends he made from all over the world. 

 

The following is an extract from the Parish leaflet of All Saints' Church Totley in January 1937. 

 

SCOUT GROUP 

ROVER SCOUTS. The Commissioner is taking the necessary steps to license the formation of a Rover Scout Crew in connection with the Group. Thus will All Saint's Group be complete. A preliminary meeting of those interested will be held when an outline of Rovering will be given. Will any at all interested please send their names at once, either to the Vicar or Mr. Aubrey? They will then receive notice of the meeting. ‘The age limit is over 17’. 

 

BOY SCOUTS. It is with mixed feelings that we report the resignation of A.S.M. Rawson. We look back on many happy times with him and recall his willing spirit to be of service at all times. Those of us who have been to camp with him know what a stalwart he was there. Mr. Aubrey loses a real supporter and adviser by his departure. We congratulate him on his appointment as Scoutmaster of St. Chad's Sheffield and wish him the best of luck and happiness in his new work. May we take this opportunity of thanking the many people who have helped two of our Scouts to raise funds for the Troup by joining their Christmas Club. It was nice to have a visit from our Brother Scouts of Our Lady and S. Thomas Troup recently when we had a most rollicking meeting together. 

 

Troup Leader Jeffrey Salt gives weekly instructions to the Troup in Physical Training - passing on knowledge he gained at a special course for leaders in Chesterfield. We welcome Deric R Platt who comes to us from the Cubs. Johnson gains his 2 years star and Barr his first. 

 

Wolf Cubs. The Cubs recently had a lantern lecture on their meeting night called "A journey to Switzerland" which contained some fine slides of the Rhineland and Switzerland.  Interest was added by A.S.M. Balbernie who has recently visited these places & was able to illuminate things by his reminiscences. Thanks to the L.N.E.R. for the free loan of these l00 fine slides. 

 

'CYMRY' 
Perhaps someone reading this will know where the Totley Church Scouts met after Mrs. Milner left Totley Hall for Baslow, Jeff could only remember that it was a Hall somewhere, but where? and for how long?. War was declared on September 3rd, 1939 and next morning Jeff volunteered for the R.A.F. depleting the Scouts of four of its founder members. My son Arthur was the Scribe to the Scouts in 1953 when the new Scout Hut in Hall Lane was opened by Mrs. Tozer of Totley Hall. This Group he says were the ‘1st Totley Scouts’ as today, but when were they founded? and what happened to 'Totley All Saint's Scout Group?'.

 

Jo Rundle

December 2005

Totley Scouts

by Jo Rundle

Lesley Aubrey (left) Totley All Saints Scoutmaster 1930-39

There is so much speculation and interest in the first Totley Scouts that I think the following might be of interest. In 1930 a man called Aubrey formed a Scout Group when Mrs Milner allowed them to use the room under the Turret kitchens as their headquarters and my brother Jeff age ten was one of the first to enrol. They were a very dedicated group and by the time he was fifteen he had qualified as a King’s Scout and been invited on two occasions to attend Windsor Castle for special celebrations and later, after the death of King George the Fifth, to represent Derbyshire at the Jamboree held near the Scottish border in 1l937. Thousands of Scouts from all over the world gathered with the new King George 6th.when their singing and hand-slapping ‘Hands, Knees, and Upsa-daisies’ went with the rhythm.

 

Their Headquarters remained in the little kitchen and was quite adequate as they spent most of their time on manoeuvres in the little wood and in the stream. Then came the War in 1939 when Jeff and my next in line brother Geoff immediately volunteered, Elijah the eldest was not allowed as he was in a reserved occupation as the pattern maker of the moulds for making the complicated bricks that lined the kilns when special designs were called for.

 

No more Scouting was done until 1944 when, so far as England was concerned the war was over, although it continued in Germany until August 12th. 1945. My son Arthur lived with my parents from the age of 2 to the age of 7 whilst I was busy as a SJAB Sister at First-aid Post 13 Prince of Wales Road Darnall when we lived at Gleadless, but soon we were to leave when I bought a field next to the Leylands on Moorwood Lane and created a nursery garden. Our son was now 12yrs. old and had become a Totley Scout, when, I believe, Birley was the name of the Scoutmaster. It is obvious that Arthur had been the scribe for, many years later after leaving Grammar School, and spending four years at Durham University he spent the next eight years in Antarctica and it was during this time that I found the scribes book in a drawer in his room and noticing that it had not been used for so many years I took it to Totley and was advised to take it to a man called Carter, which I did, but, having arrived amid some sort of argument, he took it from my hand and threw it through an open door onto a sofa in an adjoining room. Nobody knows what happened to it since!!

 

I remember the wooden Scout-hut newly built just over the curb in the field that later was to be the site of the new College. It was to be officially opened the following day by Lady ? who lived in a very large house off Newfield Road, or Lane, Dore. The date 1946, College opened about 1952; I remember standing on Moorwood Lane with G.H.B. Ward and looking down on it when he said "It’s like a great big packing case".

 

October 2011

 

 

From J. W. Abson

I was in the Totley Scouts in 1938, before John Tinsdale and John Wood joined.  Tinsdales took the grocers shop (run by Walter Evans at that time) at the top of Main Avenue.  John Wood of course arrived in Totley when his father also John Wood came from Norton to be Headmaster at All Saints School.  I remember him having a house built just before Main Avenue.    

 

The Scout Master at that time was called Mr Aubrey.  I believe his first name was Leslie and he lived on the Laverdene Estate.  He was helped by another Rover Scout by the name of Epworth.  The Scout Hut was in what is now the car park at The Crown Inn We used to go to camp some weekends in Farmer Kelk and Farmer Inkeringill fields both of Fanshawe Gate but as most of the scouts at that time were in the choir we had to be back to sing in the choir for the evening service at All Saints Church, otherwise the Vicar Rev Jerry Hutton would be rather displeased. There was also a Lady Akela for the cubs, I cannot recall her name but she lived down Main Avenue, near Baggy Parker, her brother was also in the scouts. I also remember going with the troop to Chesterfield Church for a special service and we walked there and back. It is pleasing to know that scouting in Totley is still going strong. 

 

November 2011

 

 

 

 

From Richard Frost

A Happy New Year to everyone!  

 

We are celebrating a centenary this year. The 85th Scout Group which started 100 years ago merged with the 215th only 13 years ago. We have put together a potted history of Scouting in Totley - which we think is correct!

 

Scouting first started in 1907 after the publication of the fortnightly magazine written by Baden-Powell called “Scouting for Boys”. The first Scout Troops in Sheffield were at Croft House and Darnall Church. Each Troop officially registered were given a number, in these cases 1st & 2nd Sheffield.  

 

The first registered Troop in the Totley area seems to have been at Cherry Tree Orphanage in 1911, and was the 21st Sheffield. This was followed by the 42nd in 1914 and the 85th in 1915, so it seems that Scouting in Sheffield was becoming very popular. It is not known where the 42nd met until its close in 1922, but the 85th met first at St. Johns Church, Abbeydale Road and then, after the 21st combined with it in 1919, shared its time at the orphanage.  

 

The 115th came along in 1919, based at the URC on Totley Brook Road. It closed in 1926 but was revived in 1962 and continues to this day.  

1934 saw two Troops registered; the 209th at Totley Methodist and 215th at Totley All Saints. 209 th closed after a few years but the 215th continues now, based at the Scout Hut on Aldam Road. So for over 100 years now there has been at least one Scout Group continuously in Totley, and sometimes three. At 215th there are now over 120 boys and girls involved, aged 6 to 18 years.  

 

If anyone has any further information or memories we would love to hear from you.  

 

In 2015 we intend to celebrate this achievement in various ways, including a Centenary Camp in June for Beaver, Cubs, Scouts and Explorers, when we hope to have over 100 attending at a nearby camp site that we are taking over for the weekend.  

 

Although we bought extra tents last year we will need to do so again this year in order to accommodate the growing number of children. We will use funds raised from our annual 20p challenge, as we did last year, to pay for the new tents. This involves giving each child a tube of ‘Smarties’, letting them eat the contents and then refilling with 20p's.  

 

Lastly please take a look at our job advert if you are also  interested in helping any of our sections. We have a growing number of men and women helping but we need more.

 

Richard Frost, Chairman, 1st Totley Scouts 
TotleyChair@aol.com 
0114 236 3603 

February 2015

 

 

Latest News

On Wednesday 28th June, we welcome back Ann Beedham whose talk is called Days of Sunshine and Rain: Peak District Rambling in the 1920s, with words and photographs from the life of George Willis Marshall who was a keen walker and who took lots of photos in the 1920s and 1930s as he wandered the hills of Derbyshire with his friends. They were pioneers of the ‘right to roam’ and took part in the famous Kinder Trespass of 1932. The meeting is in Totley Library beginning at 7.30 p.m.

 

On Wednesday 26th July Alan Powell will tells us about The History of Newspapers in Sheffield. Alan is a former Editor of the Sheffield Telegraph and The Star newspapers and had a career of more than 44 years in journalism in Sheffield. The meeting as usual is in Totley Library beginning at 7.30 p.m. Non-members are welcome.

 

The first meeting after our summer break will be on Wednesday, 27th September when we present an illustrated talk by David Templeman called Mary, Queen of Scots: The Final Journey - From Sheffield to Fotheringhay (1584-1587). This talk relates the compelling tale of the events leading up to and including Mary’s trial and execution. Mary’s courage and conduct come to the fore as she takes her tragic story through Wingfield Manor, Tutbury Castle, Chartley Manor, Texall and culminating in the climax at Fotheringhay Castle where she is tried and executed for High Treason. But was she guilty? That is the question this talk addresses. The meeting is in Totley Library, starting at 7.30 p.m. 

A recently discovered box of WWII correspondence reveals the story of how a small group of ladies from Dore and Totley recruited knitters from the west of Sheffield and how their efforts made them the country's greatest provider of Comforts for the Minesweeping crews of the Royal Navy. The story is told in Knit For Victory, a new book from Totley History Group. Written by Pauline Burnett, it has 82 pages and many illustrations. It is on sale in Totley Rise Post Office and local shops. Also available in Dore at the Village Store or direct via our website.

Since 1875 when there was only a Rolling Mill and Chemical Yard alongside the river a mile from Totley, the area has changed beyond anyone's imagination  This book by Pauline Burnett tells the story of how it was named and grew into the community we know today. The Rise of Totley Rise has 94 pages including a useful index and is profusely illustrated throughout with many previously unpublished photographs from private collections. 

The story is told in Totley War Memorial WW1 of the ten men from our village who gave their lives in the Great War. Written by Pauline Burnett, Jim Martin and Dorothy Prosser, a chapter is devoted to each of the soldiers with a family tree followed by as much information as could be discovered about the men and their families. There is also information about their military careers and the actions in which they lost their lives. The book has 64 pages and is illustrated throughout with photographs of the men, their families and the houses where they lived.

Ron Wijk of Nieuw-Vennep in the Netherlands has sent us two scanned images of drawings of old cottages made by the celebrated Dutch painter, Anton Pieck (1895-1987) simply annotated "Totley", and wondered whether we could identify their locations.

We would like to thank Christopher Rodgers for bringing to our attention this fascinating log of the 85th Sheffield (St. John's and Totley Orphanage) Wolf Cub Pack for 1927-45. The log is published jointly by Sheffield Scout Archives and Totley History Group as a free PDF download. It is illustrated by no fewer than 92 photographs and is supported by a comprehensive index and biographies of some of the main participants.

Following our Open Meeting event on School Days, Roger Hart, Howard Adams and John Timperley have each written to us with their memories of Norwood School, which was located in the rooms attached to the Dore & Totley United Reformed Church on Totley Brook Road. 

On 22nd July 1909 the children of Dore and Totley Schools celebrated by a pageant the union of England under King Ecgbert which took place at Dore in AD 827. The pageant was devised and written by Mrs Sarah Milner and her daughter Marjorie and performed in a field close to Avenue Farm in front of a large audience. Photographs of the event survive together with a fragment of the script.

John Edward Greenwood Pinder had lived all 46 years of his life in Totley but on census night, Sunday 2 April 1911, he was not at home; he was in Derby Gaol serving a sentence of three months hard labour. From the age of 20, John had been in and out of local courts for a series of minor offences including drunkenness, assault, wilful damage and night poaching. Finally he was sent to gaol for cutting down and stealing 86 small trees which he sold in Sheffield market for Christmas.

We have already transcribed the census returns for Totley, Totley Rise and Dore. Now we have transcribed Census Strays. These are people who were born in Totley but are missing from our earlier transcriptions. They may have been living, working or studying elsewhere or just away from home on the night the census was taken. Two people were in prison. Others were in Union Workhouses, hospitals and asylums. Fully indexed strays from the 1851, 1861, 1881, 1891, 1901 and 1911 censuses are available now. 

We wish to thank Gillian Walker for allowing us to digitize an archive of material about the 1st Totley Scout Group. Most of the material was collected by Arthur Percival Birley in the period 1949-51 and there are many interesting documents pertaining to the building of the scout hut on Totley Hall Lane. In addition four Newsletters survive, two from the 1940s and two from 1971.

We are grateful to Angela Waite and All Saints' Parish Church for giving us access to baptismal and kindergarten birthday rolls dating from 1926 to 1941. We have transcribed the names, addresses, birthdates and baptismal dates and created an alphabetical index of entries for you to search. 

Edmund Sanderson, a Sheffield estate agent, aquired the land on either side of the old drive to Totley Grove in 1874 and divided it into plots for development. He called it the Totley Brook Estate. But before many houses were built, the estate road was severed in two by the building of the Dore & Chinley Railway line. The eastern end of the road became the cul-de-sac we now call Grove Road

John Roberts was born in Sheffield in 1798. He became a partner in one of the leading silversmiths firms in the city before moving to Abbeydale Park in 1851 and extending the house in Victorian gothic style. He paid for the building of St. John's Church and was believed to dispense more in charity than any other person in the neighbourhood including his protege Ebenezer Hall.

The Coke Family owned the Totley Hall Estate from 1791 to 1881. With the aid of a family tree to guide us, Josie Dunsmore takes us through the story of their tenure. 

When the Rev. D'Ewes Coke inherited the Totley Hall Estate in 1791 it had two farms. Josie Dunsmore tells the story of how the two farms were combined under the tenancy of Peter Flint with the aid of field maps drawn by Flint himself and later by the Fairbanks family.

Do you think you recognize this face? More than sixty photographs of the girls and teachers at Hurlfield Grammar School for Girls in the 1940s were given to Totley History Group by Avril Critchley, who was herself a student at the school. The collection includes fifteen form photographs from June 1949. There would have been a number of girls from the Totley area attending the school in those days.

Christine Weaving tells the story of her 2 x great uncle George Edward Hukin, a Totley razor-grinder, and his life-long friendship with the academic, poet, writer, and free-thinker Edward Carpenter.

Eric Renshaw (pictured here on the right with Bob Carr) grew up and lived in Totley from 1932 to 1960. Many of his memories are of a sporting nature.

We are very grateful to Gordon Grayson for giving us this splendid sale document for the Norton Hall Estates, following the death in 1850 of Samuel Shore. The estates included a large part of Totley and the document has maps and illustrations, plus schedules of land and property with the names of tenants. We have also added a transcription of the entries for Totley and Dore. 

Watch this Youtube video of the talk given by Dr. Mark Frost and Sally Goldsmith on Ruskin, Totley and St. George's Farm. The talk was hosted by Totley History Group on 20th May 2015 as part of the Ruskin in Sheffield programme. Also enjoy a video of the outdoor performance Boots, Fresh Air & Ginger Beer written by Sally.

When Jacqueline A. Gibbons became interested in what made her father tick, it began a journey through WW1 archive records and led to her flying from Toronto to visit the house and village where he lived and the countryside that he so much enjoyed. Jacqueline reminds us that in the early 20th century Sheffield was a driving force of industry and that Totley was the place where many of its remarkable people lived and where they formulated their ideas.

Edgar Wood was the designer of The Dingle, 172 Prospect Road, built in 1904 for Rev. William Blackshaw, the founder of the Croft House Settlement. The house, together with its western terrace and boundary walls, has now been awarded Grade II listed building status. 

What was probably "the most perfect little garden railway in existence" in 1910 was to be found in the grounds of Brook House, Grove Road, the home of its designer and constructor, Guy Mitchell. Look at some wonderful photographs and read reports in newspapers and a full appreciation in Model Railways magazine. 

We have now completed our transcription of Totley School's Admission Records for the period from 1877 to 1914. There is also a useful index to the names of the scholars and to their parents or guardians. We are very grateful to Sheffield Archives and Local Studies Library for allowing us to transcribe and publish these records and for permission to reproduce the photograph of a specimen page of the register.

On 8, 9 and 11 November 2014 Totley History Group held an exhibition at Dore & Totley United Reformed Church to commemorate the centenary of the First World War. Below are additional links to some of the photographs we were lent and stories we researched especially for the exhibition.

 

Oscar Creswick was a local farmer who served with the Army Service Corps in Salonika and who after the war returned to Totley to become the innkeeper of the Cricket Inn and a member of the village's successful tug of war team.

 

 

Walter Evans was a market gardener who also ran a small grocery shop on Hillfoot Road when war broke out. He fought with the Machine Gun Corps at the fourth battle of Ypres. After the war, Walter ran a grocers shop at the top of Main Avenue.

 

 

 

Fred Cartwright was another Totley soldier who survived the Great War. He fought in France and Belgium and although he wasn't wounded he was gassed and was home on sick leave when his daughter was delivered by Nurse Jessop during a snowstorm in January 1917.

 

 

Maurice Johnson joined the Yorkshire Dragoons, a territorial unit, on 1 Jan 1914 and so was called up at the very start of the war. He fought throughout the war on the Somme, at Ypres and at Cambrai. After demobilization in 1919 Maurice returned to his old occupation the steel industry.

 

 

Bill Glossop lent us a letter written by his father, William Walton Glossop to his wife describing life in the army during training in the north east of England and asking her to keep him in mind with the children.

 

 

The photo above provides a link to an album of photographs taken of WW1 Hospitals at St. John's, Abbeydale and the Longshaw Estate.

 

 

Nora Green, of Chapel Lane, was only 14 when war broke out. In 1914 she was ill with diphtheria and was sent to the isolation hospital at Holmley Lane, Dronfield. Nora recovered and wrote a letter of thanks to one of the hospital staff and the reply she received survives. 

 

 

We have collected together on this page the names of local men who appear on various War Memorials and Rolls of Honour in Totley, Dore, Abbeydale and Norton.

 

 

Unfortunately we were unable to identify all the photographs we were lent of Totley Soldiers. Please take a look at this album to see if you recognize any of the missing names.

This walk visits locations that have strong associations with Totley during the First World War. It includes the homes of the ten soldiers from the village who lost their lives, the auxiliary hospitals, war memorials, and even the rifle range on which the soldiers trained. Take a look at the first draft of a new walk by the authors of "Totley War Memorial WW1 1914-1918"

As we have nowhere to exhibit memorabilia and artifacts, we have decided to create a Virtual Museum instead, starting with old bottles that were found under the floor of the Old Infant School. Please contact us by email if you would like to see the real thing or have things that you own and would like to see added to the virtual museum.

We wish to thank the Trustees of Cherrytree for giving us permission to publish transcriptions of the Cherrytree Orphanage Admissions Book entries for the years 1866-1929. There is also an alphabetical index for you to look at.

With more people having access to faster broadband and mobile networks, we have uploaded seven full and unedited oral history recordings and also added more short excerpts for you to listen to.

Our transcriptions of local trade directories have been expanded to cover the 95 years from 1837-1932 and have also been indexed. From the days when there were a handful of farmers, stone masons, saw handle makers & scythe grinders to the wonders of the Totley Bridge Garage Company, Betty's Boudoir and The Heatherfield Shopping Centre.

We continue to add to our Totley Newspaper Archive. Recent entries have included several about John Roberts and the building of St. John's Church. There are several about the history of Brinkburn Grange and its first occupier, John Unwin Wing, an accountant who later lived at Totley Hall before being convicted of forgery and fraud and sentenced to 7 years imprisonment in Pentonville gaol. There are more than 50 articles from the 1880s and 1890s about Joseph Mountain and the Victoria Gardens, and twenty on the construction of the Totley Tunnel and the Dore and Chinley Railway.

Totley Church of England Parish Magazines for the years 1922-1939 and 1948-1967 with notices of births, marriages and deaths and accounts of spiritual, educational, charitable and social matters in the village. 

Around 90 photographs taken by Stuart Greenhoff for his thesis A Geographical Study of Dore and Totley including several of Totley Moor Brickworks. Superb!  

Chronologically ordered snippets of information recorded by Brian Edwards during his many years of research into our local history.

Read the inscriptions on more than 600 gravestones in  the churchyard.

 

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