Totley History Group
Totley History Group

Ebenezer Hall: Grand Old Man of Abbeydale

Ebenezer Hall Ebenezer Hall

Ebenezer Hall was born in Middleton by Wirksworth, Derbyshire, on 18 November 1820 and baptized at St. Mary's Church, Wirksworth on 11 May 1823. He was named after his great-grandfather, Ebenezer Hall (1735-1803) and was the third of twelve children born to Gilbert Hall, a lead miner, and his wife Elizabeth (nee Slack): Ann (b. 1816), John (b. 1818), Ebenezer (b. 1820), Joshua (b. 1823), Job (b. 1825), Joseph (b. 1827), Daniel (b. 1829), Stephen (b. 1832), Sarah (b. 1834), Benjamin (b. 1836), Samuel (b. 1839) and David (b. 1842). 

 

A very bright boy, he attended Cromford School and was recommended by the headmaster, William Shaw, to his friend John Roberts, a childless Sheffield silversmith who wished to adopt a promising young man to succeed to his silverplating business. So in 1836, at the age of 16, Ebenezer was apprenticed to the firm of Wilkinson & Roberts and he went to live with his employer, John Roberts and his wife Sarah at their home in Shrewsbury Road, in the Park district of Sheffield. During the next eleven years Ebenezer worked well becoming a manager for the firm and travelling on arduous stagecoach journies to London, Edinburgh and elsewhere. When his original partner Henry Wikinson retired in 1847, Roberts offered to take Ebenezer into partnership and the firm was renamed Roberts & Hall.

 

Roberts's contribution to the partnership of £2,750 greately exceded the £100 staked by Ebenezer Hall, who agreed to have his profits retained by the firm until they reached parity with his senior partner. Evidently, this arrangement gave Ebenezer further incentive to succeed. The firm prospered, exhibiting at the Great Exhibition of 1851 where they were awarded a Certificate of Merit.  

 

In 1852 Roberts & Hall amalgamated with Martin & Naylor of Fargate, Sheffield and became known as Martin, Hall & Co. Around this time several of Ebenezer's brothers John, Joshua and Job all joined the firm, becoming departmental managers. Joshua Hall became a partner in the firm around the year 1857 but he died on 12 June 1861, aged 38, after a protracted illness. Some of Ebenezer's nephews also joined the firm, prominent among whom was his namesake, the son of his elder brother John Hall.

 

Ebenezer Hall first went into land purchase in 1849, when he bought a plot near Mickley Lane. In 1851, John Roberts bought a house on Abbeydale Road called Abbeydale Villa - later to be known as Abbeydale Hall; he also bought a large amount of land on both sides of Baslow Road. Ebenezer moved into Abbeydale Hall with John Roberts and his wife. In 1867 Ebenezer made a large purchase of land in Totley including Greenoak House for £10,000. The following year he took up his first public appointment as a Trustee for Cherrytree Orphanage.

 

Both Roberts and Hall were regular church attenders and felt the need for a religious outlet in their area. The cornerstone of St John's Church was laid in 1873, Roberts giving the land and £5,000 for the building. The endowment fund for the church of £2,000 was made up of contributions of £1,150, £550 and £300 from Roberts, Hall and the Duke of Devonshire respectively. Ebenezer Hall also made a substantial contribution towards the erection of the Vicarage.

 

Ebenezer continued to live as a boarder at Abbeydale Hall after the death of Sarah Roberts on 9 November 1874 and on 17 February 1876 he married Sarah Wilkinson in London at St. Paul's, Covent Garden. Sarah was the daughter of the late George Wilkinson and had been living at Abbeydale Hall for some years as a companion to her aunt Sarah Roberts. The service was conducted by Rev. J. T .F. Aldred, the vicar of Dore, assisted by Rev. H. B. Wilkinson of Sharnbrook, Bedfordshire, brother to the bride. Their honeymoon was delayed until 1879 when the couple visited Australia but this was thought to be as much to do with business as with pleasure. The couple attended the Sydney Exhibition where Martin, Hall & Co. won the highest award of merit.

 

In 1880 Ebenezer bought the Abbeydale Park Estate from the aged John Roberts who continued to live there with Ebenezer and Sarah Hall until his death on 11 April 1888.

 

After Martin, Hall & Co. became a limited company, Ebenezer had more time to pursue other business interests by taking directorships of several other companies, including those of Sanderson Brothers & Newbould Ltd., Sheffield and Rotherham Joint Stock Banking Co. Ltd., Sheffield United Gas-Light Company and Eyam Mining Company. He was also appointed a Derbyshire Magistrate in April 1884 but doesn't appear to have been very active in that role for very long. Although a strong Conservative, he took no prominent part in politics and sought no municipal role. In his younger days he had been a well-known sportsman, regularly following hounds, and enjoying a day's fishing. He was one of the earliest members of the Sheffield Book Club and a frequenter of the Sheffield Club. He was also a knowledgeable collector of paintings and a member of the Council of the Sheffield School of Art for five years between 1877 and 1881.

 

In 1881 Ebenezer had paid £2,460 for the Totley Rolling Mills including 6 cottages and a little over 8 acres of land on both sides of Baslow Road at Totley Rise. From the price paid it would appear that he bought it as a going concern but it would seem that the business did not survive the economic downturn for very long as the mill ponds had been filled in before the 1896 Ordnance Survey was made. 

 

In 1883 his longstanding arguments with the Midland Railway Company began, over the passage of the new line through his estate. Ebenezer owned about 60 acres of land at Abbeydale Park, including nearby Brinkburn Grange and West View Cottage. After a legal wrangle lasting five years, the select committee declined to accede to Ebenezer's petition for a tunnel to mitigate the effects of the railway and on 18 June 1886 the Dore and Chinley Railway Bill finally became enacted and Ebenezer was obliged to sell about 30 acres of his estate to the railway company. Despite these aggravations, Ebenezer was on a committee to provide mission work among the labourers employed on the Dore & Chinley Railway and to assist the local schools, whose finances were being drained by the increased numbers of children from the huts of the navvies. 

 

His other charitable works included membership of the Management Committee of the Charity School for Poor Girls in Sheffield, for which both he and his wife gave £2 2s. 2d annually. In 1893 he gave £3,000 for Church rooms for St John's and further money for the improvement of the Church. When the foundation stone of the new chancel of Dore Church was laid he gave an inscribed silver trowel. Later he donated £50 towards a new organ for Dore Church and further money to augment the stipend of the Vicar of Dore. In 1895, when the Wesleyan Methodists of Totley Rise wanted to build a new church, Ebenezer gave them free of charge a plot of 1,500 square yards from the parcel of land he had bought at Totley Rolling Mill.

 

Ebenezer Hall, portrait by Joseph Herbert Bentley R.B.A., 1896 Ebenezer Hall, portrait by Joseph Herbert Bentley R.B.A. Paid for by donations from the inhabitants of Dore & Totley and presented on 13 November 1896.
Ebenezer remained in good health until shortly before his death on 28 June 1911 at the age of 91. He was buried in Sheffield General Cemetery in the same vault as John and Sarah Roberts. His widow Sarah continued to live at Abbeydale Hall until her own death in 1919.

 

Ebenezer Hall left an estate valued at £194,632 18s. 3d. After provision for his wife's relatives and friends, from his Residuary Fund he left money for the Sheffield Royal Infirmary (£300), Sheffield Royal Hospital (£500), Sheffield Children's Hospital (£250), Sheffield Jessop's Hospital (£250), Sheffield Nurses Home and Training Institution (£100), Sheffield Boy's Charity School (£200), Sheffield Girl's Charity School (£300), Totley Cherrytree Orphanage (£350) and Wirksworth Hospital (£250). He left money to the Vicar and Churchwardens of Middleton-by-Wirksworth, Totley, Dore and Holmsfield to buy governmental stock to produce a yearly sum for the benefit of the poor. St John's, Abbeydale benefited by £3,000 to be spent on the church as did to a lesser extent the Churches of Middleton in Wirksworth (£2,500) and St John's, Park (£300).

Ebenezer Hall in Public Records

Births, Marriages and Deaths

Name  Event  Place Registration Date  Age

Ebenezer

Hall

Birth

 

Middleton by Wirksworth, Derbyshire

 

18 Nov 1820

 

 

Ebenezer

Hall

Baptism

 

St. Mary's Church, Wirksworth, Derbyshire 11 May 1823  2

Sarah Ann

Wilkinson (wife)

Birth

 

 

Middlesex, London

 

 

c. 1836

 

 

 

Ebenezer Hall and Sarah Ann Wilkinson 

Marriage

 

 

 

St. Paul's, Covent Garden, London

 

 

17 Feb 1876

 

55

 

Ebenezer Hall

Death

 

Abbeydale Park, Dore, Derbyshire

28 Jun 1911

 

91

 

Ebenezer

Hall

Burial

 

General Cemetery,

Sheffield

1 Jul 1911

 

 

Sarah Ann

Hall (wife)

 

Death

 

 

Imperial Hotel, Llandudno, 

Caernarvonshire

30 Jul 1919

 

 

84

 

 

Sarah Ann

Hall (wife)

Burial

 

General Cemetery.

Sheffield

2 Aug 1919

 

 

1851 Census, Commercial Hotel, Old Town Street, St. Andrew, Plymouth, Devon

Name Relation Condition Age/Born Occupation Birthplace
Francis H. Chubb 

Head

 

Married

 

33

c. 1818

inn keeper

 

Devon, Lamerton

... and others          

Ebenezer

Hall

Visitor

 

Unmarried

 

30

c. 1821

silver plater

 

Yorkshire, Sheffield

1861 Census, Abbeydale Villa, Dore, Derbyshire

Name Relation Condition Age/Born Occupation Birthplace
John Roberts

Head

 

Married

 

63

c. 1798

gentleman

 

Sheffield, 

Yorkshire

Sarah Roberts

Wife

 

Married

 

55

c. 1806

  Sheffield, Yorkshire
Sarah Wilkinson

Visitor

 

Unmarried

 

26

c. 1835

 

London

 

Ebenezer Hall

Boarder

 

Unmarried

 

40

c. 1821

silver plater

 

Middleton

 

Ann Ashmore

Servant

 

Unmarried

35

c. 1826

housekeeper and cook Brightside, Yorkshire

Jane Smith

 

Servant

 

Unmarried

 

25

c. 1836

housemaid

 

Lancashire

 

Elizabeth Smith

Servant

 

 

14

c. 1847

kitchen maid

 

Gainsbrough, Yorkshire

1871 Census, Abbeydale Park, Dore, Derbyshire

Name Relation Condition Age/Born Occupation Birthplace

John Roberts

 

 

Head

 

 

 

Married

 

 

 

73

c. 1798

 

 

farmer of 105 acres employing 4 men and aboy

Sheffield, 

Yorkshire

 

 

Sarah Roberts

Wife

 

Married

 

66

c. 1805

  Sheffield, Yorkshire
Ebenezer Hall

Boarder

 

Unmarried

 

50

c. 1821

silversmith

 

Middleton, Derbyshire
Sarah Ann Wilkinson

Cousin

 

Unmarried

 

36

c. 1835

companion

 

London, Middlesex
Hannah Carter

Servant

 

Unmarried

 

33

c. 1838

cook

 

Ambergate, Derbyshire
Fanny Richardson

Servant

 

Unmarried

 

25

c. 1846

housemaid

 

Ambergate, Derbyshire
Mary Ann Robinson

Servant

 

Unmarried

 

20

c. 1851

housemaid

 

Totley, Derbyshire
Louisa Redfern

Servant

 

Unmarried

 

16

c. 1855

housemaid

 

Sheffield, Yorkshire

1881 Census, Abbeydale Park The Hall, Dore, Derbyshire

Name Relation Condition Age/Born Occupation Birthplace

Ebenezer Hall

 

 

 

Head

 

 

 

 

Married

 

 

 

 

60

c. 1821

 

 

 

managing director, silversmiths and electro platers

Middleton, Derbyshire

 

 

 

Sarah Ann Hall

Wife

 

Married

 

45

c. 1836

  London, Middlesex
John Roberts

Resident

 

Widower

 

83

c. 1798

retired manufacturer

Sheffield, Yorkshire

Mary Hustice (Anstiss)

Hendy

Visitor

 

 

Unmarried

 

 

19

c. 1862

 

 

 

Trowbridge, Wiltshire

 

Fanny Marshall

Servant

 

Unmarried

 

24

c. 1857

parlourmaid

 

Retford, Lincolnshire
Elizabeth A. Baines

Servant

 

Unmarried

 

24

c. 1857

housemaid

 

Gainsborough, Lincolnshire
Florence Eleanor Hall

Servant

 

 

Unmarried

 

 

19

c. 1862

 

housemaid

 

 

London, Middlesex

 

Mary Ellis

 

Servant

 

Unmarried

 

19

c. 1862

kitchenmaid

 

Selstone, Derbyshire

1891 Census, Abbeydale Park, Abbeydale Road, Dore, Derbyshire

Name Relation Condition Age/Born Occupation Birthplace

Ebenezer Hall

 

Head

 

 

Married

 

 

70

c. 1821

 

magistrate not in buiness

Middleton by Wirksworth, Derbyshire

Sarah Ann Hall

Wife

 

Married

 

55

c. 1836

  London, Middlesex
Edwin James Roberts

Visitor 

 

 

Single

 

 

30

c. 1861

 

silversmiths clerk

 

Lancashire, Liverpool

 

Sarah Bouldin

Servant

 

 

Single

 

 

35

c. 1856

 

cook

 

Yorkshire, Walkley

 

Charlotte Ann Womack

Servant

 

 

Single

 

 

26

c. 1865

 

housemaid

 

 

Yorkshire, Stannington

 

Maria

Hewitt

Servant

 

Single

 

24

c. 1867

housemaid

 

Derbyshire, Brimmington

Lucy

Hannah Merton

Servant

 

 

Single

 

 

21

c. 1870

 

housemaid

 

 

Derbyshire, Totley Bents

 

Ellen Thirza

Barnsdall

Servant

 

 

Single

 

 

21

c. 1870

 

kitchenmaid

 

 

Yorkshire, Sheffield

 

Charles Joseph Attakbury

Boarder

 

 

Single

 

 

18

c. 1873

 

silversmiths apprentice

 

Nottinghamshire, Sutton On Trent

 

1901 Census, Abbeydale Park, Dore, Derbyshire

Name Relation Condition Age/Born Occupation Birthplace

Ebenezer Hall

Head

 

Married

 

80

c. 1821

living on own means

Wirksworth, Derbyshire

Sarah A. Hall

Wife

 

Married

 

65

c. 1836

 

London

 

Maria J. Beck

Wife's Sister

Widow

 

55

c. 1846

living on own means

London

 

Mary Corsaw

Visitor

 

Single

 

71

c. 1830

living on own means

Yorkshire,

Sheffield

Susan Johnson

Servant

 

Single

 

28

c. 1873

cook

 

Yorkshire,

Sheffield

Elizabeth A. Surridge

Servant

 

 

Single

 

 

27

c. 1874

 

parlourmaid

 

 

Northampton-

shire,

Wellingboro'

Emily Frith

Servant

 

Single

 

22

c. 1879

housemaid

 

Derbyshire,

Dore

Louisa J. Surridge

Servant

 

Single

 

18

c. 1883

housemaid

 

Bedfordshire,

Ludwell

Ruth A. Hinchcliffe

Servant

 

Single

 

22

c. 1879

kitchenmaid

 

Yorkshire,

Sheffield

1911 Census, Abbeydale Park,  Dore, Derbyshire

Name Relation Condition Age/Born Occupation Birthplace

Ebenezer Hall

 

Head

 

 

Married

 

 

90

c. 1821

 

retired silver plate manufacturer

Middleton,

Derbyshire

 

Sarah Ann Hall

Wife

 

Married

 

75

c. 1836

 

London

 

Maria J. Beck

Sister

 

Widow

 

65

c. 1846

 

London

 

Mary Anstiss

Hendy

Niece

 

 

Single

 

 

48

c. 1863

 

 

Wiltshire,

Trowbridge

 

Emma

Bell

Cert. Nurse

Single

 

52

c. 1859

certified nurse

Weston Super

Mare

Miranda Mary Wilkinson

Niece

 

 

Single

 

 

21

c. 1890

 

Oxford student

 

Bedfordshire,

Sharnbrook

 

Susan Johnson

Domestic

Servant

Single

 

38

c. 1873

cook

 

Yorkshire,

Sheffield

Minnie Storer

Domestic

Servant

Single

 

34

c. 1877

parlourmaid

 

Yorkshire,

Sheffield

Lily Woodcock

Domestic

Servant

Single

 

26

c. 1885

head

housemaid

Yorkshire,

Rotherham

Hilda Nendick

Domestic

Servant

Single

 

19

c. 1892

2nd housemaid

Yorkshire,

Sheffield

Annie Kinman

Domestic

Servant

Single

 

17

c. 1894

3rd housemaid

Yorkshire,

Sheffield

Rose Dyson

Domestic

Servant

Single

 

22

c. 1889

kitchenmaid

 

Yorkshire,

Sheffield

Wills and Probate

Hall Ebenezer of Abbeydale Park Dronfield Derbyshire esquire died 28 June 1911 Probate Derby 10 August to Samuel Clark Shaw Hall silversmith Alfred Ernest Maxfield solicitor and Arnold Thomas Watson accountant and sharebroker. Effects £194632 18s. 3d,

Latest News

The first meeting after our summer break will be on Wednesday, 27th September when we present an illustrated talk by David Templeman called Mary, Queen of Scots: The Final Journey - From Sheffield to Fotheringhay (1584-1587). This talk relates the compelling tale of the events leading up to and including Mary’s trial and execution. Mary’s courage and conduct come to the fore as she takes her tragic story through Wingfield Manor, Tutbury Castle, Chartley Manor, Texall and culminating in the climax at Fotheringhay Castle where she is tried and executed for High Treason. But was she guilty? That is the question this talk addresses. The meeting is in Totley Library, starting at 7.30 p.m. 

Then on Wednesday, 25th October we will be holding another in our popular series of themed Open Meetings, when you will be invited to share memories of Totley Then and Now. There will be over a hundred pairs of photographs showing how Totley's buildings, lanes, and open spaces looked in the past compared with the same scene today. The meeting will be held in Totley Library beginning as usual at 7.30 p.m.

A recently discovered box of WWII correspondence reveals the story of how a small group of ladies from Dore and Totley recruited knitters from the west of Sheffield and how their efforts made them the country's greatest provider of Comforts for the Minesweeping crews of the Royal Navy. The story is told in Knit For Victory, a new book from Totley History Group. Written by Pauline Burnett, it has 82 pages and many illustrations. It is on sale in Totley Rise Post Office and local shops. Also available in Dore at the Village Store or direct via our website.

Since 1875 when there was only a Rolling Mill and Chemical Yard alongside the river a mile from Totley, the area has changed beyond anyone's imagination  This book by Pauline Burnett tells the story of how it was named and grew into the community we know today. The Rise of Totley Rise has 94 pages including a useful index and is profusely illustrated throughout with many previously unpublished photographs from private collections. 

The story is told in Totley War Memorial WW1 of the ten men from our village who gave their lives in the Great War. Written by Pauline Burnett, Jim Martin and Dorothy Prosser, a chapter is devoted to each of the soldiers with a family tree followed by as much information as could be discovered about the men and their families. There is also information about their military careers and the actions in which they lost their lives. The book has 64 pages and is illustrated throughout with photographs of the men, their families and the houses where they lived.

Walter Waller Marrison moved to Totley around 1897 with his wife and their two young sons. He was a house builder who constructed properties around Totley Brook and Greenoak before ill health forced him to take up less physically demanding work. In 1904 he took over the tenancy of the grocers and off licence at number 71 Baslow Road. After his death in 1908, his widow Kate and later their eldest son Jack continued to run the business until it was sold in 1934.   

Ron Wijk of Nieuw-Vennep in the Netherlands has sent us two scanned images of drawings of old cottages made by the celebrated Dutch painter, Anton Pieck (1895-1987) simply annotated "Totley", and wondered whether we could identify their locations.

We would like to thank Christopher Rodgers for bringing to our attention this fascinating log of the 85th Sheffield (St. John's and Totley Orphanage) Wolf Cub Pack for 1927-45. The log is published jointly by Sheffield Scout Archives and Totley History Group as a free PDF download. It is illustrated by no fewer than 92 photographs and is supported by a comprehensive index and biographies of some of the main participants.

Following our Open Meeting event on School Days, Roger Hart, Howard Adams and John Timperley have each written to us with their memories of Norwood School, which was located in the rooms attached to the Dore & Totley United Reformed Church on Totley Brook Road. 

On 22nd July 1909 the children of Dore and Totley Schools celebrated by a pageant the union of England under King Ecgbert which took place at Dore in AD 827. The pageant was devised and written by Mrs Sarah Milner and her daughter Marjorie and performed in a field close to Avenue Farm in front of a large audience. Photographs of the event survive together with a fragment of the script.

John Edward Greenwood Pinder had lived all 46 years of his life in Totley but on census night, Sunday 2 April 1911, he was not at home; he was in Derby Gaol serving a sentence of three months hard labour. From the age of 20, John had been in and out of local courts for a series of minor offences including drunkenness, assault, wilful damage and night poaching. Finally he was sent to gaol for cutting down and stealing 86 small trees which he sold in Sheffield market for Christmas.

We have already transcribed the census returns for Totley, Totley Rise and Dore. Now we have transcribed Census Strays. These are people who were born in Totley but are missing from our earlier transcriptions. They may have been living, working or studying elsewhere or just away from home on the night the census was taken. Two people were in prison. Others were in Union Workhouses, hospitals and asylums. Fully indexed strays from the 1851, 1861, 1881, 1891, 1901 and 1911 censuses are available now. 

We wish to thank Gillian Walker for allowing us to digitize an archive of material about the 1st Totley Scout Group. Most of the material was collected by Arthur Percival Birley in the period 1949-51 and there are many interesting documents pertaining to the building of the scout hut on Totley Hall Lane. In addition four Newsletters survive, two from the 1940s and two from 1971.

We are grateful to Angela Waite and All Saints' Parish Church for giving us access to baptismal and kindergarten birthday rolls dating from 1926 to 1941. We have transcribed the names, addresses, birthdates and baptismal dates and created an alphabetical index of entries for you to search. 

Edmund Sanderson, a Sheffield estate agent, aquired the land on either side of the old drive to Totley Grove in 1874 and divided it into plots for development. He called it the Totley Brook Estate. But before many houses were built, the estate road was severed in two by the building of the Dore & Chinley Railway line. The eastern end of the road became the cul-de-sac we now call Grove Road

John Roberts was born in Sheffield in 1798. He became a partner in one of the leading silversmiths firms in the city before moving to Abbeydale Park in 1851 and extending the house in Victorian gothic style. He paid for the building of St. John's Church and was believed to dispense more in charity than any other person in the neighbourhood including his protege Ebenezer Hall.

The Coke Family owned the Totley Hall Estate from 1791 to 1881. With the aid of a family tree to guide us, Josie Dunsmore takes us through the story of their tenure. 

When the Rev. D'Ewes Coke inherited the Totley Hall Estate in 1791 it had two farms. Josie Dunsmore tells the story of how the two farms were combined under the tenancy of Peter Flint with the aid of field maps drawn by Flint himself and later by the Fairbanks family.

Do you think you recognize this face? More than sixty photographs of the girls and teachers at Hurlfield Grammar School for Girls in the 1940s were given to Totley History Group by Avril Critchley, who was herself a student at the school. The collection includes fifteen form photographs from June 1949. There would have been a number of girls from the Totley area attending the school in those days.

Christine Weaving tells the story of her 2 x great uncle George Edward Hukin, a Totley razor-grinder, and his life-long friendship with the academic, poet, writer, and free-thinker Edward Carpenter.

Eric Renshaw (pictured here on the right with Bob Carr) grew up and lived in Totley from 1932 to 1960. Many of his memories are of a sporting nature.

We are very grateful to Gordon Grayson for giving us this splendid sale document for the Norton Hall Estates, following the death in 1850 of Samuel Shore. The estates included a large part of Totley and the document has maps and illustrations, plus schedules of land and property with the names of tenants. We have also added a transcription of the entries for Totley and Dore. 

Watch this Youtube video of the talk given by Dr. Mark Frost and Sally Goldsmith on Ruskin, Totley and St. George's Farm. The talk was hosted by Totley History Group on 20th May 2015 as part of the Ruskin in Sheffield programme. Also enjoy a video of the outdoor performance Boots, Fresh Air & Ginger Beer written by Sally.

When Jacqueline A. Gibbons became interested in what made her father tick, it began a journey through WW1 archive records and led to her flying from Toronto to visit the house and village where he lived and the countryside that he so much enjoyed. Jacqueline reminds us that in the early 20th century Sheffield was a driving force of industry and that Totley was the place where many of its remarkable people lived and where they formulated their ideas.

Edgar Wood was the designer of The Dingle, 172 Prospect Road, built in 1904 for Rev. William Blackshaw, the founder of the Croft House Settlement. The house, together with its western terrace and boundary walls, has now been awarded Grade II listed building status. 

What was probably "the most perfect little garden railway in existence" in 1910 was to be found in the grounds of Brook House, Grove Road, the home of its designer and constructor, Guy Mitchell. Look at some wonderful photographs and read reports in newspapers and a full appreciation in Model Railways magazine. 

We have now completed our transcription of Totley School's Admission Records for the period from 1877 to 1914. There is also a useful index to the names of the scholars and to their parents or guardians. We are very grateful to Sheffield Archives and Local Studies Library for allowing us to transcribe and publish these records and for permission to reproduce the photograph of a specimen page of the register.

On 8, 9 and 11 November 2014 Totley History Group held an exhibition at Dore & Totley United Reformed Church to commemorate the centenary of the First World War. Below are additional links to some of the photographs we were lent and stories we researched especially for the exhibition.

 

Oscar Creswick was a local farmer who served with the Army Service Corps in Salonika and who after the war returned to Totley to become the innkeeper of the Cricket Inn and a member of the village's successful tug of war team.

 

 

Walter Evans was a market gardener who also ran a small grocery shop on Hillfoot Road when war broke out. He fought with the Machine Gun Corps at the fourth battle of Ypres. After the war, Walter ran a grocers shop at the top of Main Avenue.

 

 

 

Fred Cartwright was another Totley soldier who survived the Great War. He fought in France and Belgium and although he wasn't wounded he was gassed and was home on sick leave when his daughter was delivered by Nurse Jessop during a snowstorm in January 1917.

 

 

Maurice Johnson joined the Yorkshire Dragoons, a territorial unit, on 1 Jan 1914 and so was called up at the very start of the war. He fought throughout the war on the Somme, at Ypres and at Cambrai. After demobilization in 1919 Maurice returned to his old occupation the steel industry.

 

 

Bill Glossop lent us a letter written by his father, William Walton Glossop to his wife describing life in the army during training in the north east of England and asking her to keep him in mind with the children.

 

 

The photo above provides a link to an album of photographs taken of WW1 Hospitals at St. John's, Abbeydale and the Longshaw Estate.

 

 

Nora Green, of Chapel Lane, was only 14 when war broke out. In 1914 she was ill with diphtheria and was sent to the isolation hospital at Holmley Lane, Dronfield. Nora recovered and wrote a letter of thanks to one of the hospital staff and the reply she received survives. 

 

 

We have collected together on this page the names of local men who appear on various War Memorials and Rolls of Honour in Totley, Dore, Abbeydale and Norton.

 

 

Unfortunately we were unable to identify all the photographs we were lent of Totley Soldiers. Please take a look at this album to see if you recognize any of the missing names.

This walk visits locations that have strong associations with Totley during the First World War. It includes the homes of the ten soldiers from the village who lost their lives, the auxiliary hospitals, war memorials, and even the rifle range on which the soldiers trained. Take a look at the first draft of a new walk by the authors of "Totley War Memorial WW1 1914-1918"

As we have nowhere to exhibit memorabilia and artifacts, we have decided to create a Virtual Museum instead, starting with old bottles that were found under the floor of the Old Infant School. Please contact us by email if you would like to see the real thing or have things that you own and would like to see added to the virtual museum.

We wish to thank the Trustees of Cherrytree for giving us permission to publish transcriptions of the Cherrytree Orphanage Admissions Book entries for the years 1866-1929. There is also an alphabetical index for you to look at.

With more people having access to faster broadband and mobile networks, we have uploaded seven full and unedited oral history recordings and also added more short excerpts for you to listen to.

Our transcriptions of local trade directories have been expanded to cover the 95 years from 1837-1932 and have also been indexed. From the days when there were a handful of farmers, stone masons, saw handle makers & scythe grinders to the wonders of the Totley Bridge Garage Company, Betty's Boudoir and The Heatherfield Shopping Centre.

We continue to add to our Totley Newspaper Archive. Recent entries have included several about John Roberts and the building of St. John's Church. There are several about the history of Brinkburn Grange and its first occupier, John Unwin Wing, an accountant who later lived at Totley Hall before being convicted of forgery and fraud and sentenced to 7 years imprisonment in Pentonville gaol. There are more than 50 articles from the 1880s and 1890s about Joseph Mountain and the Victoria Gardens, and twenty on the construction of the Totley Tunnel and the Dore and Chinley Railway.

Totley Church of England Parish Magazines for the years 1922-1939 and 1948-1967 with notices of births, marriages and deaths and accounts of spiritual, educational, charitable and social matters in the village. 

Around 90 photographs taken by Stuart Greenhoff for his thesis A Geographical Study of Dore and Totley including several of Totley Moor Brickworks. Superb!  

Chronologically ordered snippets of information recorded by Brian Edwards during his many years of research into our local history.

Read the inscriptions on more than 600 gravestones in  the churchyard.

 

Visitors since 24 Sep 2012:

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