Totley History Group
Totley History Group

WW1 Remembrance Walk

This walk visits locations that have strong associations with Totley during the First World War. It includes the homes of the ten soldiers from the village who lost their lives, the auxiliary hospitals, war memorials, and even the rifle range on which the soldiers trained. Some of these sites are just over the Totley township boundary into neighbouring Dore and Bradway which like Totley were in the county of the Derbyshire at that time. The walk is based upon research by Pauline Burnett, Jim Martin and Dorothy Prosser, whose book "Totley War Memorial WW1 1914-1918" was first published by Totley History Group in 2011.  

 

It is also available in PDF format as an Z-fold leaflet download for home printing. Best on A3 but can be read, just about, on A4.

WW1 Remembrance Walk v1.2 30 July 2014
WW1 Remembrance Walk v1.2 8pt.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [1.1 MB]

The walk starts at Totley Rise Methodist Church, Baslow Road, S17 4DJ, about 5 1/2 miles southwest of Sheffield on the A621 and a stopping point on bus route 97 from the city centre. There is a large car park for visitors to the church which is accessible from an entrance on Grove Road. The walk ends about half a mile further up Baslow Road at the War Memorial. The nearest bus stop is a short walk towards the city outside the Cross Scythes. The walk is entirely on paved footpaths and can be undertaken in two sections if preferred.

WW1 Remembrance Walk, part one

1. Totley Rise Methodist Church Baslow Road, west side; Roll of Honour

The Totley Rise (Wesleyan) Methodist Church has a framed WW1 Roll of Honour recording the names of those who served in the Great War, together with their regiment. A remarks column details those who lost their lives. The names of the five who died include three soldiers remembered on Totley War Memorial (Tom Fisher, Allan Hill and Bob Martin) plus two further names that do not appear on any of the memorials at Totley, Dore, Abbeydale, Holmesfield or Norton (David Cockshott and Roland Hill).  

Return to the dual carriageway and turn left towards the centre centre. Immediately after the railway bridge turn left down a footpath which leads to Totley Brook Road. Cross the road and turn left.

2. Dore & Totley United Reformed Church Totley Brook Road, north side; Roll of Honour

Inside what was the Union Church, now the Dore and Totley United Reformed Church, is a  roll of honour bearing the names of 3 members of the the congregation who lost their lives and a further 22 members who also served in the Great War. The names of the dead are Harold Todd and Harper Seed, both of Dore Parish, and Robert Hugh (Bob) Martin, of Glenbourne, Back Lane, Totley. The old memorial, pictured above, has recently been replaced by a more modern version as part of the renovations.  

Leaving the church, turn left and walk to the intersection of three roads: Totley Brook Road, Busheywood Road and the main road which is now called Abbeydale Road South. Turn left on the main road towards the city and walk past Abbeydale Hall and the Abbeydale Sports Club.  

3. Licensed Victuallers' Almshouses Abbeydale Road South, west side; Auxiliary hospital

The plaque on the northern gatepier of the almshouses indicates that they were used as an auxiliary hospital during the Great War. Being close to the VAD hospital at St. John's Church Rooms, it is probable that they were used as an overflow site for the less severely wounded Belgian soldiers.

Cross the main road at the pedestrian crossing and turn right walking along the eastern side of Abbeydale Road South away from the city. After the railway station, cross the busy Twentywell Lane and continue past Mercia Motors.

4. St. John's Church Rooms Abbeydale Road South, east side; VAD hospital

St. John's Church Rooms were built by Ebenezer Hall in 1893. During the First World War they were used as a VAD hospital. VAD stands for Voluntary Aid Detachment, and the volunteer staff were overseen by the British Red Cross Society. At the St John’s Hospital there were a hundred beds with the first wounded soldiers arriving there on the 21st November 1914. They were Belgian forces and thereafter many Belgian soldiers would pass through the St John’s doors.  Dr. Charles A. Thorne, who lived at The Glen, was the hospital's surgeon; he was supported by Dr. Mary Andrews and Dr. Charles O'Connor Parsons. The President of the Dore & Totley Voluntary Aid Detachment was Mrs Sarah Milner OBE of Totley Hall whose own son, 2nd Lt. Roy Milner, was one of the first soldiers from our area to die in the Great War. Sarah Milner worked tirelessly to provide aid and comforts for wounded soldiers, including working closely with the VAD hospital at St John’s. Local people raised funds to provide boots, slippers, gloves, and other little necessities. Amongst some of the more unusual ways that the hospital was supported by Dore and Totley residents was through the very regular appeal for eggs to be donated. Food not rationed could be in short supply, and giving up precious eggs was indeed a major gesture of support for the War effort. 

5. St. John's Church Abbeydale Road South, east side; War Memorial

The new parish of St. John the Evangelist was created in 1876 from adjacent parts of the parishes of Christ Church Dore and St. James Norton. The war memorial that stands in front of the church was erected on 29 Mar 1920. Thirteen of the 22 names on the octagonal base can be found on the memorials in these two older parishes and five on the war memorial in the much later parish of All Saints, Totley. Those five Totley names are Hedley Bishop, Willie Green, Allan Hill, Bob Martin and Albert Pinder. The four other names on the St. John's war memorial are: Stanley Gummer, Thomas Reginald Heap, Harold Davis and John William Masser. 

 

Stanley Gummer was born in Rotherham in 1890, the son of William Guest Gummer and his wife Gertrude (nee Hemingway), later of Totley Rise. He was educated at The Leys School in Cambridge where he was a noted scholar and active sportsman. On leaving school he became articled to a solictor in Rotherham and completed a law degree at the University of London. He became a partner in the Rotherham firm of solicitors, Messrs. Gilchard and Gummer. He was a good cricketer, playing for Rotherham Town and Yorkshire County Second XI and also a keen rugby player. Stanley married Vera Gilchard at Rotherham Church on 24 Sep 1913. The couple had two children, Dinah born in 1914 and Michael born in 1917 shortly before his father's death. At the outbreak of war, Stanley Gummer enlisted in the York and Lancaster Regiment and was quickly promoted through the ranks to Captain. He served with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders from 19 Sep 1915 until he was killed in action at Passchendaele on 9 Oct 1917 aged 27. He is remembered on Panels 125-128 of the Tyne Cot Memorial at the cemetery of the same name in Zonnebecke, Belgium.

 

Thomas Reginald Heap was born in 1881, the third son of William Heap J.P of Pymble, Selby, North Yorkshire, and educated at St Peter's School, York. On 4 Mar 1911 at St. Jude's Church, South Kensington, he married Florence Elinor Primrose Harding. He died on 25 Nov 1916 aged 35. Lieut-Commander Heap was serving aboard H.M. Trawler "Burnley", a minesweeper based at Harwich, which sank off Orfordness with all 19 on board when she hit one of 12 mines placed the previous day by German submarine UC4. Lieut-Commander Heap is remembered on Panel 18 of the Chatham Naval Memorial, on the Roll of Honour in the Chapel of St Peter's School and on the family grave at St Wilfred's Churchyard, Brayton, near Selby, North Yorkshire.

 

Inside the church is a Roll of Honour with the names of officers and men from the parish who served during the war. Ebenezer Hall paid for six tubular bells to be erected in commemoration of the peace after the Great War. These were dedicated on Sunday 21 Sep 1919.

Continue walking out of the city along the eastern side of Abbeydale Road South until just after the railway bridge, and opposite Grove Road, you come to a small triangular shaped green. Turn left down the narrow lane.

6. Rolling Mill Cottages Mill Lane, west side; home of Hedley Bishop

Colin Hedley Bishop was born in Dore on 8 April 1893 and baptized at Christ Church, Dore on 22 October 1893. He was the fifth child and second son of Colin Bishop, a gardener, and his wife Mary Ellen (nee Kirk). By August 1897 the family had moved to Totley and in the 1901 census they were living at Rolling Mill, Totley Rise. Hedley attended Totley All Saints School until April 1906 when, at the age of 13, he left to start work.  In the 1911 Census the Bishops were living in Ivy Cottage (now called Mill Cottage). Hedley was aged 17 and was working as a machine file cutter. When the First World War began, Hedley must have volunteered almost immediately and he became Service No. 2763 Private Hedley Bishop in the Queen's Own Yorkshire Dragoons. The regiment arrived at Le Havre in France on 16 July 1915 as part of the 17th (Northern) Division and were deployed to the Ypres salient. In September 1915. The Yorkshire Dragoons were involved in the Battle of Delville Wood which took place between July and early September 1915. This was a subsidiary attack of the Somme offensive and it seems very likely that Hedley was wounded during the fighting and eventually died of his wounds on 21 October 1916. He is buried in Grave K34 at Aveluy Communal Cemetery Extension. He was awarded the 1915 Star as well as the Victory Medal and British War Medal.

Retrace your steps to the main road and turn left up the dual carriageway crossing Milldale Road. Turn left down the narrow unnamed lane immediately before the crescent of shops and houses. Continue along the lane until another narrow lane joins on the right at an old farm house which is now subdivided. 

7. Glenbourne Back Lane, west side; home of Bob Martin

Robert Hugh Martin was born in Walkley on 14 November 1896, the second son of Harry Martin and his wife Jeanetta (nee Biltcliffe). The family were still living in Walkley in the 1911 census but the following year they moved to Glenbourne, on Back Lane, Totley Rise. Jeanetta's aunt, Martha Hawes, nee Wordsworth, lived next door at Glenrose. Bob was a keen sportsman who played for Totley football club. He worked for Cole Brothers in Sheffield, travelling daily from Dore & Totley station. Later he became apprenticed to Hartley & Son, printers. Bob enlisted close to his 18th birthday and joined the Household Cavalry and Cavalry of the Line Regiment, Derbyshire Yeomanry Battalion, Service No. 75965, serving overseas. On 14 November 1917, Bob's 21st birthday, he was shot in Salonika, Greece. The bullet lodged in his heart but did not kill him. He rode his horse back to camp but, as there was no x-ray facility, he had to be taken by hospital ship to the island of Malta which had excellent medical equipment and facilities. At St Elmo Hospital, Valletta, pioneering surgery was performed to remove the bullet. The operation was reported in the Daily Malta Chronicle as being "the talk of the Island". Bob's operation was successful. The bullet was removed but he died of blood poisoning on 14 March 1918. He is buried in Grave Reference C. XVII. 4. in the WW1 Section of Pieta Military Cemetery, Malta.

Returning down the hill turn right and follow the lane into Laverdene Avenue. After rounding the bend cross over Totley Brook at the footbridge on your left and ascend the lane for a short distance.

8. Brook Vale Cottage Back Lane, west side; home of Allan Hill

Herbert Allan Hill was born in a cottage on Fox Lane, Greenhill in 1888. He was the third son and fourth child of William Colin Hill, a gardener, and his wife Mary Ellen Hill nee Scothern. On 24 January 1889 he was baptized at St James's Church, Norton. By 1901 the Hills had moved to Lemont Road in Totley. Allan, like his father and two older brothers, was working as a market gardener. In 1908, at the age of 20, he decided to join the Territorial Army and signed Attestation papers on 2 April and became a volunteer in 4th (Hallamshire) Battalion of the York and Lancaster Regiment. He was discharged at the end of his two year term and went back to purely civilian life working for his father's nursery business. On 11 July 1912 Allan married Mary Jane Moore at St. John's Church, Abbeydale and the couple moved into Brook Vale Cottage on Back Lane, Totley and life went quietly on until August 1914 and the start of WW1. Allan rejoined the Hallamshires on 9 August as service number 2176 Private Hill. He advanced quickly through the ranks and on 15 March 1916 he was promoted to Sergeant. On 13 January 1917 the Hallamshires sailed from Southampton for France and on 3 May 1917 they were ordered to attack the Hindenburg Line and the village of Bullecourt. This attack failed and Allan was taken a prisoner of war and he died of his wounds at Limburg hospital on 5 June 1917. He is now buried in Grave V.F.13 at Tournai Communal Cemetery Allied Extension in Belgium.

Continue to the top of the lane and turn right along Queen Victoria Road to its junction with Mickley Lane opposite the Shepley Spitfire. Turn right and ascend the rise passing Glover Road and then cross to the west side of Mickley Lane. After passing Aldam Road, turn left at the next road, Lemont Road.  

9. Lemont Road south side; home of Willie Green

James William Green was the first child of James and Mary Alice Green who married in Christ Church, Dore in 1895. Willie's father was a mechanical engineer and for a short time after his marriage lived in Norton Woodseats where Willie was born on 17 December 1895. By 1901 the family were back in Totley living in Grange Terrace on Baslow Road opposite the Cross Scythes. Willie was admitted to Totley All Saints School in 1900, leaving to attend another school, probably in Dronfield Woodhouse, in November 1906. Willie enlisted in the Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry on 29 June 1915 as Service No. 18960 Pte James William Green, attesting at Chesterfield. He was allocated to the 2nd Battalion of the Regiment. They were stationed in France but Willie will have spent a number of weeks training before being sent to join the Battalion, so it may well have been September or October before he reached the front. November was wet and trenches had to be repaired as they fell in. Things were reasonably quiet except for occasional shelling and sniping. It remained that way throughout the spring of 1916 and time was spent training, keeping trenches in good condition, and even playing football matches. In July the 'real war' exploded with the Battle of the Somme. On November 13th, in thick mist, a number of Brigades were attempting to take and consolidate a part of the German Front Line known as “the Green Line” and it was during this attack that Willie Green was killed. His body was never recovered but he is remembered on Pier and Face 10A and 10D of the Thiepval Memorial. His family still treasure the last letter he wrote home to his parents who by now were living on Lemont Road.

Totley WW1 Remembrance Walk, part two

Continue walking to the top of Lemont Road and turn up the footpath passing Totley Library to the main road, Baslow Road. Turn left and left again at the next road, Main Avenue. Turn right at the first road, Sunnyvale Avenue and at the top of the road enter the well sign-posted grounds of All Saints' Church.  

10. All Saint's Church Totley Hall Lane, east side; dedication stone to Roy Milner

All Saint's Church was built on land that was donated by William Aldam Milner and his wife Sarah of Totley Hall. The Milners also gave £2, 000 towards the building of the church with further funding obtained from the estate of Ebenezer Hall and from smaller public donations. The church was designed by Messrs. Currey and Thompson of Derby and building work commenced on 4 June 1923. In a ceremony on 26 July 1923 attended by the Bishop of Derby, Mr. and Mrs. Milner laid the foundation stone. There is a further inscription inside the church which is often kept locked. It reads "To the dear memory of Roy Denzil Pashley Milner 2nd Lt. Sherwood Foresters who fell in the Great War Sept. 20 1914, the east end of this Church was erected by his parents."

Leave the church grounds by the main west drive and turn left into Totley Hall Lane. Totley Hall Farm and then the hall itself are on your right.

11. Totley Hall Totley Hall Lane, west side; home of Roy Milner 

Roy Milner was was born in Totley on 1 December 1892, the second son and youngest child of William Aldam Milner and Sarah Elizabeth Milner (nee Roberts), of Totley Hall. Roy was a pupil at Repton School in south Derbyshire from September 1906 to July 1911. When he left school, he joined the Army and went to the Royal Military College Sandhurst for his initial training as an officer. He obtained a commission in the 2nd Battalion of the Sherwood Foresters (Notts and Derby Regiment) on 22 January 1913 and looked forward to a promising military career. He was very popular with his fellow officers and men and he played polo for his regiment when they were stationed at Plymouth. He was also fond of hunting and he was a member of the Barlow Hunt. On the outbreak of war Sec. Lt. Milner, two other officers and a hundred men were deployed to South Shields where they took over a battleship that Armstrong, Whitworth & Company had built for Turkey but which was instead claimed by the British Government. The soldiers were on board for two days until the Royal Navy arrived to take possession of the ship. On 8 September 1914 the regiment sailed from Southampton and arrived at St. Nazaire in France on 11 September. They formed part of the 18th Brigade of the British Expeditionary Force. On 14 September Sec. Lt Milner and his men of ‘A’ company began the 350 mile march to the area around the River Aisne in Picardy. The following day the battalion marched for fifteen hours in heavy rain. The drenching rain continued as they marched for another twelve hours on the 16th. Finally, weary and footsore, they arrived at Chacrise on the 18th where they were billeted on a farm and were given a 24 hour rest period. On 19 September with three other battalions of the 18th Brigade they moved forward to the village of Vendresse in the steep-sided Troyon valley where they relieved the 1st Black Watch in the trenches. Later that day they were moved back to a reserve line. 20 September dawned wet and cold with heavy rain and sleet falling. The Sherwood Foresters joined other regiments as they attempted, with some success, to retake trenches broken into and occupied by the Germans. Roy Milner, with a fellow officer and most of their men, was cut down by heavy machine gun fire as he led a charge up the valley. On 24 September Mr and Mrs Milner received a telegram from the War Office announcing the news of Roy's death. His body now lies in Grave Ref. 6. C. 5 in the Chauny Communal Cemetery British Extension in Aisne, France.

Return up Totley Hall Lane to the cross roads at the now closed Fleur de Lys. Cross Baslow Road at the pedestrian crossing and turn left to the corner of Hillfoot Road.

12. Baslow Road cottages (demolished) Baslow Road, north side; home of Tom Fisher

Tom Brown Fisher was born on 10 October 1893 at Hallfield Farm, on Strawberry Lee Lane, Totley. He was the youngest child of Francis and Emma Fisher (nee Hill). By 1901 Tom was living in one of the now demolished cottages that stood on Baslow Road just above the corner with Hillfoot Road. Tom was enrolled at Totley All Saints School in March 1898 when he was 4 1/2 years old. In August 1907 he left school to begin work on a local farm.  By the time of the 1911 census, Tom had moved out to Beeley where he was working as a cowman at Moor Farm. Tom Fisher's Army Service Record was among the 60% destroyed during the Blitz in WW2 so it is not known when he originally joined the army. When he enlisted in the Derbyshire Yeomanry in Totley his residence was given as Holmsfield so it would seem that he had moved back to work in the local area by the early years of WW1. At some point he was transferred to the 6th Dragoons (Inniskilling) and on 1 December 1917 he took part in the cavalry charge south of Villers Guislain. The Dragoons were cut down by heavy machine-gun fire and shrapnel and 169 of them died along with 271 horses. Tom Fisher was among those who died. His body was never found but he is remembered on Panel 1 of the Cambrai Memorial at Louverval.

Walk down Hillfoot Road to the corner of Summer Lane.

13. Holly Tree Cottage Summer Lane, north side; home of Jim Parker

James Parker was the third child of John Henry and Rosa Parker and was born on 8 June 1888, being baptized at Christ Church, Dore on 8 July that year. Jim was a pupil at Totley All Saints School, enrolling just before his third birthday in 1891 and leaving ten years later to begin work. He was recorded as a labourer in the 1911 census. Initially Jim enlisted with the Lincolnshire regiment but was transferred to 507th Agricultural Company, Labour Corps. This suggests that he may have been injured but unfortunately his service records have been lost. The Agricultural Companies were normally in England, the soldiers being of the lowest fitness level but providing labour on farms to help in the production of food. The 507th Company to which Jim was attached had its HQ in Beverley and he died aged 30 in Patrington Hospital near Spurn Point, where the Agricultural Company had a training camp. The cause of death, recorded by Capt. Morgan FRCS, was influenza, pneumonia and heart failure. Jim Parker was a victim of the Spanish flu epidemic that would eventually claim more lives than those lost in the hostilities of WW1. His body was brought home and buried in the family grave in Dore Christ Church. His date of death was 10 November 1918, the eve of Armistice Day.

Carry on down Hillfoot Lane and turn right into Butts Hill.

14. Moor View Butts Hill, south side; home of Albert Pinder

Albert Pinder was baptized at Christ Church, Dore on 11 March 1891, the son of Letitia (Letty) Pinder, single woman. Four years after the birth of her son,  Letty married Robert Hodgson and they moved to Sutton in Ashfield leaving Albert to be brought up by his grandmother, Phoebe Hassall, and her second husband Frederick in Gleadless. In 1910 Albert married Ella Maude Hill, the sister of Herbert Allan Hill, another of the men named on Totley War Memorial. Their daughter was baptized at Christ Church, Dore, and named Phoebe after Albert's recently deceased and much loved grandmother. By the time of the 1911 census Albert, Ella, Phoebe and Frederick were living at Moor View House on Butts Hill, Totley. Albert gave his occupation as cutler although at his daughter's baptism a few months earlier he was a postman.  Albert's Army Service Record is among those that were destroyed during the Blitz in World War II so it is not possible to discover when he joined the Notts & Derby Regiment but by June 1917 he was among the men of the 17th Battalion (the Welbeck Rangers), who were in the trenches in France. On the 4th June the Battalion HQ was at St Jean and took several direct hits. Albert was probably wounded during the Battle of Messines Ridge which began on 7 June 1917. He died of his wounds on 20 June 1917 and is buried in Grave II.D.67 at Mendinghem Military Cemetery in Belgium.

Retrace your steps back along Butts Hill to its junction with Hillfoot Lane. Cross towards All Saint's School and the Pinfold and turn right downhill and left into the narrow Chapel Lane.

15. The Cottage Chapel Lane, east side (now part of The Old Orchard, Hillfoot Road); home of Charles and Bernard Turner

Charles and Bernard Turner were sons of Charles and Hannah Turner (nee Bingham. The house where the family lived for three generations was a small cottage and still stands, although now part of a much larger property called Old Orchard. Born on 16 August 1892, Charles junior was at Totley All Saints School from September 1898 until leaving at the age of almost 13 to begin work. He is recorded as a scythe smith, like his father, in the 1911 census and still living at home. He enlisted in the Royal Marine Light Infantry as Private PO/1399(S), although his records are lost and dates unknown. He was killed on 17 February 1917, aged 24, on the western front south of Arras in France and is buried at Queens Cemetery Bucquoy in Grave Reference I.J.5. Born in early January 1898, the school records for Bernard Turner have not been found but he is recorded in the 1911 census as a scholar. He is named as one of the children in the Pageant of King Ecgbert, performed in 1909, and written by Mrs Sarah Milner, the mother of Roy Denzil Pashley Milner, another of the men named on Totley War Memorial. Bernard's service records have survived. He enlisted on 13 September 1916  as Pte. No. 01896 with Royal Scots 2/8th Battalion. Bernard was transferred to the 2/7th, and finally the 9th Battalion on arrival in Etaples, France on 25 June 1917. He was fighting in the Battle of Menin Road, near Ypres in Passchendale, when he was reported missing on 20 September 1917. His death was officially recorded on the 23rd with the War Office being informed the following day. He was 19 years old and is remembered at the New Irish Farm Cemetery memorial. It appears Bernard's body was found and identified in 1921 and buried there in grave reference XX.D.17.

At the bottom of Chapel Lane continue through the stoop stile on to a curving paved footpath leading down to Penny Lane. Turn left passing the riding stables and the car park of the Cricket and enter the recreation ground beyond at a small wrought iron gate.

16. Recreation Ground Penny Lane, south side; site of Field Hospital

Wounded soldiers from the front line in France and Belgium were brought to the field hospital at the recreation ground fronting Cricket Inn for treatment. More serious cases were operated on at the St John's VAD Hospital and transferred to the field hospital for recovery. A regular visitor was Dr. Rice Kemper Evans, the American Vice Consul in Sheffield, who lived at Hill Crest on Baslow Road and who had been a surgeon in Franklin, Ohio, prior to accepting an appointment in the diplomatic service in 1909. Dr. Evans's expertise was greatly appreciated we are told in Dan Reynolds's personal memoirs.

Continue up Penny Lane and turn into Lane Head Road  Walk past the chicken houses of Bank View Farm and turn right into Moss Road. A short distance up the road there is a car park on the left. Follow the path at the far end behind the buildings to the field beyond. It is possible to walk along a rough path for 1000 yards uphill to the top of the Rifle Range where there are fenced off ruins.  

17. Rifle Range (demolished) Moss Lane, south side; site of Training Facility

The rifle range at Totley Bents opened in 1900 on moorland that had been acquired at the foot of Totley Moss by the 1st (Hallamshire) Volunteer Battalion of the York and Lancaster Regiment. After several months of hard work and at a cost of over £4,000 a first class rifle range had been created. The corps offered every possible facility for class firing and prize shooting, to the members of the local Yeomanry, R.A. and R.E. Volunteers and, in order to encourage rifle shooting among civilians, it granted the use of the range at a nominal rental to some four or five rifle clubs that had recently sprung up including the Dore & District Rifle Club. There was an uneasy relationship between Totley and Sheffield even in those days. Colonel Hughes applied to the Council for a grant of £2,500 to finish the marking and to reduce the debt but when the Council insisted on the Hallamshires handing over control of their facility to a committee, the application was withdrawn. During the 1900s and the years immediately prior to the outbreak of war the rifle range proved to be very popular bringing thousands of people to the area as volunteer trainees, participants in shooting competitions and as onlookers. Large scale weekend encampments under canvas were common during the summer months. In 1913 the military authorities even backed an idea to build a station at the tunnel end of Totley Brook Road to provide quicker and more convenient access to the rifle range. Although a local landowner was willing to fund the erection of the station in anticipation of building a considerable number of new houses close by, opposition from other Totley residents and a lack of interest from the Midland Railway Company directors meant that the plan never came to fruition. Perhaps that was just as well from a public safety perspective as the rifle range became used for more intensive military training throughout the war years.

Return back down Moss Lane to Lane Head Road and turn right passing Monnybrook Cattery and up the hill to Baslow Road. Turn left towards the city.

18. Totley War Memorial Baslow Road, north side; War Memorial

The building of the Totley War Memorial was delayed by the difficulty of obtaining a suitable site. This was overcome thanks to the generosity of the Vicar of Dore, William R. Gibson, who donated land on Baslow Road in August 1919. The memorial was funded by public subscription under the guidance of the Milner family of Totley Hall and built by several local stone masons including Horatio Taylor. At a dedication ceremony on Saturday 27 November 1920, the War Memorial was blessed by Archdeacon E. F. Crosse. Plaques commemorate the ten local soldiers who lost their lives in World War I and the 13 servicemen and women killed in World War II. The latter was added as recently as 1983. Totley History Group has researched the lives of the WW1 soldiers and published a book entitled “Totley War Memorial WW1 1914-1918”.

The nearest bus stop for the 97 route into the city centre is a short distance away at the Cross Scythes. Those who have parked at Totley Rise Methodist Church should continue down Baslow Road. 

Latest News

On Wednesday 28th June, we welcome back Ann Beedham whose talk is called Days of Sunshine and Rain: Peak District Rambling in the 1920s, with words and photographs from the life of George Willis Marshall who was a keen walker and who took lots of photos in the 1920s and 1930s as he wandered the hills of Derbyshire with his friends. They were pioneers of the ‘right to roam’ and took part in the famous Kinder Trespass of 1932. The meeting is in Totley Library beginning at 7.30 p.m.

 

On Wednesday 26th July Alan Powell will tells us about The History of Newspapers in Sheffield. Alan is a former Editor of the Sheffield Telegraph and The Star newspapers and had a career of more than 44 years in journalism in Sheffield. The meeting as usual is in Totley Library beginning at 7.30 p.m. Non-members are welcome.

 

The first meeting after our summer break will be on Wednesday, 27th September when we present an illustrated talk by David Templeman called Mary, Queen of Scots: The Final Journey - From Sheffield to Fotheringhay (1584-1587). This talk relates the compelling tale of the events leading up to and including Mary’s trial and execution. Mary’s courage and conduct come to the fore as she takes her tragic story through Wingfield Manor, Tutbury Castle, Chartley Manor, Texall and culminating in the climax at Fotheringhay Castle where she is tried and executed for High Treason. But was she guilty? That is the question this talk addresses. The meeting is in Totley Library, starting at 7.30 p.m. 

A recently discovered box of WWII correspondence reveals the story of how a small group of ladies from Dore and Totley recruited knitters from the west of Sheffield and how their efforts made them the country's greatest provider of Comforts for the Minesweeping crews of the Royal Navy. The story is told in Knit For Victory, a new book from Totley History Group. Written by Pauline Burnett, it has 82 pages and many illustrations. It is on sale in Totley Rise Post Office and local shops. Also available in Dore at the Village Store or direct via our website.

Since 1875 when there was only a Rolling Mill and Chemical Yard alongside the river a mile from Totley, the area has changed beyond anyone's imagination  This book by Pauline Burnett tells the story of how it was named and grew into the community we know today. The Rise of Totley Rise has 94 pages including a useful index and is profusely illustrated throughout with many previously unpublished photographs from private collections. 

The story is told in Totley War Memorial WW1 of the ten men from our village who gave their lives in the Great War. Written by Pauline Burnett, Jim Martin and Dorothy Prosser, a chapter is devoted to each of the soldiers with a family tree followed by as much information as could be discovered about the men and their families. There is also information about their military careers and the actions in which they lost their lives. The book has 64 pages and is illustrated throughout with photographs of the men, their families and the houses where they lived.

Ron Wijk of Nieuw-Vennep in the Netherlands has sent us two scanned images of drawings of old cottages made by the celebrated Dutch painter, Anton Pieck (1895-1987) simply annotated "Totley", and wondered whether we could identify their locations.

We would like to thank Christopher Rodgers for bringing to our attention this fascinating log of the 85th Sheffield (St. John's and Totley Orphanage) Wolf Cub Pack for 1927-45. The log is published jointly by Sheffield Scout Archives and Totley History Group as a free PDF download. It is illustrated by no fewer than 92 photographs and is supported by a comprehensive index and biographies of some of the main participants.

Following our Open Meeting event on School Days, Roger Hart, Howard Adams and John Timperley have each written to us with their memories of Norwood School, which was located in the rooms attached to the Dore & Totley United Reformed Church on Totley Brook Road. 

On 22nd July 1909 the children of Dore and Totley Schools celebrated by a pageant the union of England under King Ecgbert which took place at Dore in AD 827. The pageant was devised and written by Mrs Sarah Milner and her daughter Marjorie and performed in a field close to Avenue Farm in front of a large audience. Photographs of the event survive together with a fragment of the script.

John Edward Greenwood Pinder had lived all 46 years of his life in Totley but on census night, Sunday 2 April 1911, he was not at home; he was in Derby Gaol serving a sentence of three months hard labour. From the age of 20, John had been in and out of local courts for a series of minor offences including drunkenness, assault, wilful damage and night poaching. Finally he was sent to gaol for cutting down and stealing 86 small trees which he sold in Sheffield market for Christmas.

We have already transcribed the census returns for Totley, Totley Rise and Dore. Now we have transcribed Census Strays. These are people who were born in Totley but are missing from our earlier transcriptions. They may have been living, working or studying elsewhere or just away from home on the night the census was taken. Two people were in prison. Others were in Union Workhouses, hospitals and asylums. Fully indexed strays from the 1851, 1861, 1881, 1891, 1901 and 1911 censuses are available now. 

We wish to thank Gillian Walker for allowing us to digitize an archive of material about the 1st Totley Scout Group. Most of the material was collected by Arthur Percival Birley in the period 1949-51 and there are many interesting documents pertaining to the building of the scout hut on Totley Hall Lane. In addition four Newsletters survive, two from the 1940s and two from 1971.

We are grateful to Angela Waite and All Saints' Parish Church for giving us access to baptismal and kindergarten birthday rolls dating from 1926 to 1941. We have transcribed the names, addresses, birthdates and baptismal dates and created an alphabetical index of entries for you to search. 

Edmund Sanderson, a Sheffield estate agent, aquired the land on either side of the old drive to Totley Grove in 1874 and divided it into plots for development. He called it the Totley Brook Estate. But before many houses were built, the estate road was severed in two by the building of the Dore & Chinley Railway line. The eastern end of the road became the cul-de-sac we now call Grove Road

John Roberts was born in Sheffield in 1798. He became a partner in one of the leading silversmiths firms in the city before moving to Abbeydale Park in 1851 and extending the house in Victorian gothic style. He paid for the building of St. John's Church and was believed to dispense more in charity than any other person in the neighbourhood including his protege Ebenezer Hall.

The Coke Family owned the Totley Hall Estate from 1791 to 1881. With the aid of a family tree to guide us, Josie Dunsmore takes us through the story of their tenure. 

When the Rev. D'Ewes Coke inherited the Totley Hall Estate in 1791 it had two farms. Josie Dunsmore tells the story of how the two farms were combined under the tenancy of Peter Flint with the aid of field maps drawn by Flint himself and later by the Fairbanks family.

Do you think you recognize this face? More than sixty photographs of the girls and teachers at Hurlfield Grammar School for Girls in the 1940s were given to Totley History Group by Avril Critchley, who was herself a student at the school. The collection includes fifteen form photographs from June 1949. There would have been a number of girls from the Totley area attending the school in those days.

Christine Weaving tells the story of her 2 x great uncle George Edward Hukin, a Totley razor-grinder, and his life-long friendship with the academic, poet, writer, and free-thinker Edward Carpenter.

Eric Renshaw (pictured here on the right with Bob Carr) grew up and lived in Totley from 1932 to 1960. Many of his memories are of a sporting nature.

We are very grateful to Gordon Grayson for giving us this splendid sale document for the Norton Hall Estates, following the death in 1850 of Samuel Shore. The estates included a large part of Totley and the document has maps and illustrations, plus schedules of land and property with the names of tenants. We have also added a transcription of the entries for Totley and Dore. 

Watch this Youtube video of the talk given by Dr. Mark Frost and Sally Goldsmith on Ruskin, Totley and St. George's Farm. The talk was hosted by Totley History Group on 20th May 2015 as part of the Ruskin in Sheffield programme. Also enjoy a video of the outdoor performance Boots, Fresh Air & Ginger Beer written by Sally.

When Jacqueline A. Gibbons became interested in what made her father tick, it began a journey through WW1 archive records and led to her flying from Toronto to visit the house and village where he lived and the countryside that he so much enjoyed. Jacqueline reminds us that in the early 20th century Sheffield was a driving force of industry and that Totley was the place where many of its remarkable people lived and where they formulated their ideas.

Edgar Wood was the designer of The Dingle, 172 Prospect Road, built in 1904 for Rev. William Blackshaw, the founder of the Croft House Settlement. The house, together with its western terrace and boundary walls, has now been awarded Grade II listed building status. 

What was probably "the most perfect little garden railway in existence" in 1910 was to be found in the grounds of Brook House, Grove Road, the home of its designer and constructor, Guy Mitchell. Look at some wonderful photographs and read reports in newspapers and a full appreciation in Model Railways magazine. 

We have now completed our transcription of Totley School's Admission Records for the period from 1877 to 1914. There is also a useful index to the names of the scholars and to their parents or guardians. We are very grateful to Sheffield Archives and Local Studies Library for allowing us to transcribe and publish these records and for permission to reproduce the photograph of a specimen page of the register.

On 8, 9 and 11 November 2014 Totley History Group held an exhibition at Dore & Totley United Reformed Church to commemorate the centenary of the First World War. Below are additional links to some of the photographs we were lent and stories we researched especially for the exhibition.

 

Oscar Creswick was a local farmer who served with the Army Service Corps in Salonika and who after the war returned to Totley to become the innkeeper of the Cricket Inn and a member of the village's successful tug of war team.

 

 

Walter Evans was a market gardener who also ran a small grocery shop on Hillfoot Road when war broke out. He fought with the Machine Gun Corps at the fourth battle of Ypres. After the war, Walter ran a grocers shop at the top of Main Avenue.

 

 

 

Fred Cartwright was another Totley soldier who survived the Great War. He fought in France and Belgium and although he wasn't wounded he was gassed and was home on sick leave when his daughter was delivered by Nurse Jessop during a snowstorm in January 1917.

 

 

Maurice Johnson joined the Yorkshire Dragoons, a territorial unit, on 1 Jan 1914 and so was called up at the very start of the war. He fought throughout the war on the Somme, at Ypres and at Cambrai. After demobilization in 1919 Maurice returned to his old occupation the steel industry.

 

 

Bill Glossop lent us a letter written by his father, William Walton Glossop to his wife describing life in the army during training in the north east of England and asking her to keep him in mind with the children.

 

 

The photo above provides a link to an album of photographs taken of WW1 Hospitals at St. John's, Abbeydale and the Longshaw Estate.

 

 

Nora Green, of Chapel Lane, was only 14 when war broke out. In 1914 she was ill with diphtheria and was sent to the isolation hospital at Holmley Lane, Dronfield. Nora recovered and wrote a letter of thanks to one of the hospital staff and the reply she received survives. 

 

 

We have collected together on this page the names of local men who appear on various War Memorials and Rolls of Honour in Totley, Dore, Abbeydale and Norton.

 

 

Unfortunately we were unable to identify all the photographs we were lent of Totley Soldiers. Please take a look at this album to see if you recognize any of the missing names.

This walk visits locations that have strong associations with Totley during the First World War. It includes the homes of the ten soldiers from the village who lost their lives, the auxiliary hospitals, war memorials, and even the rifle range on which the soldiers trained. Take a look at the first draft of a new walk by the authors of "Totley War Memorial WW1 1914-1918"

As we have nowhere to exhibit memorabilia and artifacts, we have decided to create a Virtual Museum instead, starting with old bottles that were found under the floor of the Old Infant School. Please contact us by email if you would like to see the real thing or have things that you own and would like to see added to the virtual museum.

We wish to thank the Trustees of Cherrytree for giving us permission to publish transcriptions of the Cherrytree Orphanage Admissions Book entries for the years 1866-1929. There is also an alphabetical index for you to look at.

With more people having access to faster broadband and mobile networks, we have uploaded seven full and unedited oral history recordings and also added more short excerpts for you to listen to.

Our transcriptions of local trade directories have been expanded to cover the 95 years from 1837-1932 and have also been indexed. From the days when there were a handful of farmers, stone masons, saw handle makers & scythe grinders to the wonders of the Totley Bridge Garage Company, Betty's Boudoir and The Heatherfield Shopping Centre.

We continue to add to our Totley Newspaper Archive. Recent entries have included several about John Roberts and the building of St. John's Church. There are several about the history of Brinkburn Grange and its first occupier, John Unwin Wing, an accountant who later lived at Totley Hall before being convicted of forgery and fraud and sentenced to 7 years imprisonment in Pentonville gaol. There are more than 50 articles from the 1880s and 1890s about Joseph Mountain and the Victoria Gardens, and twenty on the construction of the Totley Tunnel and the Dore and Chinley Railway.

Totley Church of England Parish Magazines for the years 1922-1939 and 1948-1967 with notices of births, marriages and deaths and accounts of spiritual, educational, charitable and social matters in the village. 

Around 90 photographs taken by Stuart Greenhoff for his thesis A Geographical Study of Dore and Totley including several of Totley Moor Brickworks. Superb!  

Chronologically ordered snippets of information recorded by Brian Edwards during his many years of research into our local history.

Read the inscriptions on more than 600 gravestones in  the churchyard.

 

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